How Much Is A Plymouth Cranbrook Worth [You Asked]

When it comes to classic cars, there are few that are as iconic as the Plymouth Cranbrook. First introduced in 1950, the Cranbrook was Plymouth’s top-of-the-line model and was available in both a two-door and four-door body style. It was powered by a flathead six-cylinder engine that produced 100 horsepower and was mated to a three-speed manual transmission.

While the Cranbrook was never a high-performance car, it was well-built and stylish, which helped it become one of the most popular cars of its era. Today, the Cranbrook is a highly sought-after collector car and can command a hefty price tag.

So, how much is a Plymouth Cranbrook worth? It depends on a number of factors, including its condition, rarity, and provenance. A well-preserved Cranbrook in excellent condition can fetch upwards of $50,000, while a rare example that has been meticulously restored can easily exceed $100,000.

Whether you’re looking to buy or sell a Plymouth Cranbrook, it’s important to work with a knowledgeable classic car specialist who can help you navigate the market and ensure that you get the best possible price.

What is a Plymouth Cranbrook?

The Plymouth Cranbrook is a car that was produced by the Plymouth division of the Chrysler Corporation from 1951 to 1953. The Cranbrook was the entry-level Plymouth model for 1951, replacing the Special Deluxe. It was replaced by the Belvedere for 1954.

The Cranbrook was available in a wide variety of body styles, including a two-door coupe, a four-door sedan, a four-door station wagon, and a two-door convertible. All of these body styles were available with either a six-cylinder or an eight-cylinder engine.

The Cranbrook was powered by a 170-cubic-inch six-cylinder engine that produced 97 horsepower. This engine was paired with a three-speed manual transmission.

The Cranbrook was available with a number of optional features, including an automatic transmission, power brakes, power steering, and a radio.

The Cranbrook was Plymouth’s best-selling model in 1951, with over 84,000 units sold. This made it the sixth best-selling car in the United States that year.

The Plymouth Cranbrook was replaced by the Belvedere for 1954. The Belvedere was available in a wider variety of body styles and had a more powerful engine.

What is a Plymouth Savoy?

The Plymouth Savoy is a full-size automobile that was produced by Plymouth from 1954 to 1964. The Savoy was introduced for the 1954 model year as a two-door sedan, and was later joined by a four-door sedan and a two-door hardtop. For the 1957 model year, a four-door station wagon was introduced, and a four-door hardtop was added for 1958.

The Savoy was initially powered by Plymouth’s “Power Flow” six-cylinder engine, although a V8 engine was introduced in 1955. For 1957, the Savoy was available with Plymouth’s “Golden Commando” V8 engine.

The Savoy was discontinued after the 1964 model year, as Plymouth began to focus on its more popular Valiant and Belvedere models.

What is a Plymouth Savoy?

The Plymouth Savoy is a full-size automobile that was produced by Plymouth from 1954 to 1964. The Savoy was introduced for the 1954 model year as a two-door sedan, and was later joined by a four-door sedan and a two-door hardtop. For the 1957 model year, a four-door station wagon was introduced, and a four-door hardtop was added for 1958.

The Savoy was initially powered by Plymouth’s “Power Flow” six-cylinder engine, although a V8 engine was introduced in 1955. For 1957, the Savoy was available with Plymouth’s “Golden Commando” V8 engine.

The Savoy was discontinued after the 1964 model year, as Plymouth began to focus on its more popular Valiant and Belvedere models.

What was the difference between a Belvedere and a Belvedere II?

The Plymouth Belvedere is a model of automobile which was produced by Plymouth from 1954 to 1970. The Belvedere name was first used on a show car in 1954 which later became a production model for the 1955 model year. The Belvedere was the top of the line model for Plymouth that year. For 1956, the Belvedere again was the top of the line model for Plymouth. In 1957, the Belvedere range was expanded to include a four door sedan and a station wagon.

The Belvedere II was introduced in 1965 as a premium trim level of the Belvedere. The Belvedere II came standard with a V8 engine, power steering, power brakes, and air conditioning. The Belvedere II was available in both two door and four door body styles.

The main difference between a Belvedere and a Belvedere II is the level of trim and equipment. The Belvedere II was the top of the line model for Plymouth and as such, came standard with more luxury and convenience features than the Belvedere.

Which Plymouth had a push button transmission?

In the 1950s, push button transmissions were a novelty. They were found in a few high-end cars, but they were mostly a gimmick. That all changed in 1957 when Plymouth introduced the first push button transmission in a mass-produced car. The push button transmission was available in the Plymouth Plaza, Belvedere, and Fury.

The push button transmission was an option that cost an extra $175. It was a three-speed transmission that was controlled by buttons on the dash. There were buttons for ‘low’, ‘second’, and ‘drive’. The push button transmission was a big selling point for Plymouth and it helped them to sell a lot of cars.

The push button transmission was popular for a few years, but it eventually fell out of favor. It was replaced by the more conventional column-shift transmission. The push button transmission was a cool feature, but it was ultimately too complicated and expensive to maintain.

Liam

Hi, I'm the initiator and writer of this blog. Cars were and will be my first love, and my favorite hobby, that's why I decided to start this blog and write about my discoveries and techniques to improve my cars or repair them.